Posted in Collection, Pens, Reviews, Stories

The (Wish) List

I usually acquire pens based on impulse and circumstance (i.e. dumb luck), which has introduced me to a variety of odd pens. Some contemporary, some vintage, but all speak to me. The pens on this list are not pens to finish my collection. Nope, these are pens that have caught my eye, struck my fancy, and now I have a penchant for owning them. Oh and BTW, I love lists. Without further ado, in alphabetical order, let’s start the new year with a wish list ….

Benu – Silver Skull

“Silver Skull Fountain Pen is inspired by our childhood dreams of piracy and adventures. Rebellion and daring design is created for those who share the same ideals. Skillfully crafted by hand from glossy resin with its hand-friendly shape and shining decorative ring the Silver Skull Pen is a stylish accessory and a real pleasure to use.” – Benu Pen.com

I just thought this pen is the coolest. Why? Well I have a fondness for black pens, plus I have a fascination for Día de Muertos and who doesn’t like pirates. There are many “skull” pens on the market but this is the one for me.

Benu Silver Skull

Irish Pens – Black Carbon Fiber

“At 66 grams, Rhodium and Titanium wrapped in Black Carbon Fiber and with a Peter Bock nib at the business end this is a serious fountain pen, a fountain pen that will feel at home in the most exclusive boardroom, business setting or in your personal writing space, its gravitas will not go unnoticed whenever it is used. When the written words really matter! this is the fountain pen to use.” – Irish Pens.ie

Irish Pens, an Irish indie pen company specializing in pens made in County Cavan, Ireland of Irish native woods. I originally was drawn to their pens made from bog oak, but I saw this one! You have to admit, it takes your breath away. No surprise, this pen is the most expensive on the list.

Irish Pens Carbon Black

Kaweco – Student Pen

“Nostalgic fountain pen in soft green with golden details made of precious resin. The Student 60’s Swing impresses with a soft and organic green. The combination of green and golden elements is harmonious and underlines the series’s nostalgic, bulky shape. It matches the motto of the Swinging Sixties: Harmony and peace. The Student fountain pen with its curved pen body made of high-quality resin guarantees a haptic and visual writing pleasure.” – Kaweco Pen.com

Germans are known for their over engineering not for their simplicity, this this pen is the exception. The design, aesthetics, complimentary colors of ivory and green – beauty in simplicity. I do wish the section was not gold, but rather the same color as the cap.

Kaweco Student

Parker – 51

“When it introduced the “51” in 1941, the George S. Parker Company knew it had a winner. The pen was stylish but not flashy, durable but not clunky, and reliable but not overengineered. Over the next 31 years, the pen proved itself immensely popular. Tales are told of people who, unable to afford a whole pen, would purchase only a cap to clip in a pocket, giving the appearance of a complete pen.“ – Richards Pens.com

Parker 51 is the one vintage pen everyone should own, or so I have been told. After reading tons of accolades, this pen is worthy of the distinction. It is an attractive pen, unique in design. I am looking for an acceptable 1941 pen but they are not common. I fancy the Cedar Blue color but as mentioned I’m sure dumb luck will prevail and I’ll get what I get.

Parker 51

**** Update, a 1941 or maybe it’s a 1944 (more on this at a later time) is in the mail and of course it is not Cedar Blue.

Scrikss – Heritage Black GT

“Launched in 2014 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Scrikss company, the Heritage range is intended to be emblematic, a flagship of the brand Scrikss. The painstaking design is a combination between traditional and modernism, having as inspiration the aqueducts model that surrounded the old city of Istanbul in the past. It is created by the Turkish designer Kunter Sekercioglu.” – Scrikss Pen.com.tr

I stumbled on this pen after I bought a Scrikss 419. A lovely metal pen, with laser etched scrollwork. I feel like there is an elegance inspired by Instanbul. I have not found a US dealer as yet.

Scrikss Heritage GT

Posted in Pens, Reviews, Stories

Scrikss 419 Piston filler

Company Backstory

Scrikss is a pen manufacturer based in Istanbul, Turkey – established in 1964. Yup they make fountain pens in Turkey. The company name is of Spanish origin, derived from the word ‘Escriure,’ which means ‘writing’ in the Catalan language.

During the Spanish Civil War, Scrikss started producing fountain pens in Albacete, Spain. In the late 50s, rights to the name Scrikss are sold to a Swiss company. Subsequently, all rights to the brand are sold to Turkish investors and Scrikss Maden ve Plastik Sanayi A.Ş. is born.

Since 1964, the company has been producing Scrikss ballpoint pens in it’s factory at Bahçelievler, followed by fountain pen production in 1966. Except for the nib, everything relating to the fountain pens was manufactured domestically in Turkey.

In 1974, Waterman agreed to a deal licensing the production of the Jif-Waterman fountain pen, cartridges and ink to the Scrikss company in Turkey. Jif-Waterman is credited with the first commercially successful ink cartridge, which was made of glass ink cartridges in 1936.

My pen a Scrikss 419

Scrikss pens are not generally available in the US; however, they can be found on eBay and at the odd pen retailer. In 2020, Scrikss re-introduced the 419 model with new colors, a piston filler, and an acrylic resin barrel. I picked up a red one because it was cheaper ($28 vs $32) and I don’t have a red pen.

First impressions

The pen came in a big box, trying to make a positive impression I guess. The pen itself is very light, topping the scale at 11g (or 0.40 oz). Not a surprise as it is only made of resin. Capped, the pen measures 125mm while the barrel is 11mm across. A couple twists (one complete rotation) removes the cap revealing a gold plated Scrikss medium nib with a plastic feed – pretty standard stuff. The cap band is gold plate and tapers down to the barrel, with the name “Scrikss” repeating on the band. The cap clip is also gold plated with a large “S” within a crest.

The pen comes with a piston feed, meaning it doesn’t accept cartridges or a removable converter. Simply turn the end-cap on the barrel and a piston moves down the ink reservoir. Dip the nib into the ink and turn the end-cap the other way, and the piston retracts filling the pen with ink. When the piston is fully retracted the cap fits snuggly against the barrel. Sorry I am the vintage pen guy and I got the biggest kick out of this feature. Plus the barrel nearest to the section is clear acrylic so you can see the ink reserves.

All inked up, time to apply pen to paper, it instantly began writing. I was surprised at how well the medium nib did on cheaper paper. There are far more issues with my bad handwriting than the pen. Because it is a medium nib the ink dried noticeably slower than let’s say the Conklin All American with a fine nib. Both test I used Waterman Serenity Blue ink.

Opinions

Other then the lack of weight to the pen, I really liked it. I enjoyed how the pen felt in my hand, I am not one to post the cap but the size was good. The lack of weight does give it a cheap feel, but I’m am biased towards pens with some weight to them. Added bonus, my wallet liked it! Would I buy another? Well let’s say I was searching for other models they offer and their Heritage Black GT caught my attention. The bad news is I could only find it at a pen dealer in Romania, selling for $178. I am adding the Black GT to my wish list of pens.

Other reviews

Awesome little, great pen!